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Know your numbers

Your lab numbers may help you and your doctor monitor your treatment.1

Why keep track of your numbers?

If you have relapsed multiple myeloma, measuring the amount of M-protein in your blood is one way your doctor can see how your treatment is working. Your M-protein level is a very important number to keep track of. But there are many other numbers that can show how you are doing with your KYPROLIS® (carfilzomib) treatment.1 Talk with your doctor about why your M-protein numbers and other lab numbers are important to your treatment.

The Lab Results Tracker gives you a place to write down your M-protein numbers and other lab numbers and help you track them. Track your numbers and find other helpful tools and resources.

Below you can learn about many types of lab measurements.

Complete blood count (CBC)

A measure of the number of red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets in the blood. These 3 types of cells are made in the bone marrow. With multiple myeloma, the cancer cells can crowd out these normal cells. This can lead to low blood cell counts.2

  • White blood cells (WBCs)
    A type of blood cell that fights infection and disease. Low WBC counts increase the risk of infection. If your count drops below 0.5 x 109/L, your doctor may change your dose of KYPROLIS.2-4
  • Absolute neutrophil count (ANC)
    A measure of the number of neutrophils in the blood. Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell. They help the body fight infection.5
  • Red blood cells (RBCs)
    A type of blood cell that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of your body via the protein hemoglobin. Low RBC counts may mean you have anemia.6,7
  • Hemoglobin (Hgb)
    A protein that carries oxygen in red blood cells. When there are too many myeloma cells, there might not be enough room for red blood cells in the bone marrow. This lowers Hgb levels.8-9
  • Platelets
    A part of the blood that helps blood clot to slow or stop bleeding. Low platelet levels increase the risk of bleeding. If your platelet count is less than 10 x 109/L, your doctor may change your dose of KYPROLIS.10

M-proteins (monoclonal proteins)

A type of abnormal protein made by multiple myeloma cells. Multiple myeloma cells are cancerous plasma cells. High levels of this protein can damage organs. Measuring M-protein levels is one way your doctor knows how well your multiple myeloma treatment is working.11

  • Serum protein electrophoresis (SPEP)
    A test to measure the amount of M-protein in the blood. High levels of M-protein may be a sign of advanced multiple myeloma.1
  • Urine protein electrophoresis (UPEP)
    A test to measure the amount of M-protein in the urine. The results can help your doctor find out if you have kidney damage. Kidney damage is a common complication when someone has multiple myeloma.1,12

Blood chemistry

A blood sample used to measure the amounts of certain substances in your blood. This sample will help your doctor see how your kidneys are working. It can also help determine whether you have bone damage and how severe your multiple myeloma is.1

  • Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum
    A test that measures the levels of nitrogen in the blood. Nitrogen comes from urea, a substance formed when the body breaks down protein in the liver. A high level of urea nitrogen in the blood may be a sign of kidney damage.13
  • Creatinine, serum
    A blood test that measures creatinine, a waste product created by your muscles. Creatinine is filtered out by the kidneys. High levels of creatinine may be a sign of kidney damage.1
  • Protein, total, serum
    A test that measures the amount of 2 types of proteins in your blood: albumin and globulin. Proteins are important parts of all cells and tissues. Albumin helps prevent fluid from leaking out of blood vessels. Globulins are an important part of your immune system.14
  • Calcium, total, serum
    A blood test that evaluates the calcium levels in your blood. Calcium is a mineral found mostly in bones. Too much calcium in the blood may be a sign that myeloma is causing bone to break down.1
  • Beta2-microglobulin, serum
    Beta2-microglobulin is a protein found on plasma cells. Patients with multiple myeloma have a higher amount of this protein in their blood. The amount of beta2-microglobulin in your blood can help your doctor figure out how severe your multiple myeloma is. This can help your doctor decide what your treatment options are and the likely course of your disease (prognosis*).15

*Terms in burgundy can be found in the Glossary.

References

1. Referenced with permission NCCN Guidelines for Patients®: Multiple Myeloma V.1.2016. ©National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc 2016. All rights reserved. Accessed May 2, 2016. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to NCCN.org. NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK®, NCCN®, NCCN GUIDELINES®, and all other NCCN Content are trademarks owned by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2. Signs and Symptoms of Multiple Myeloma. American Cancer Society. Accessed March 21, 2016. 3. NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms. White Blood Cell. Accessed April 28, 2016. 4. KYPROLIS [prescribing information]. Thousand Oaks, CA: Onyx Pharmaceuticals Inc., an Amgen Inc. subsidiary; 2016. 5. NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms. ANC. Accessed May 19, 2016. 6. NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms. Red Blood Cell. Accessed April 28, 2016. 7. NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms. Anemia. Accessed April 28, 2016. 8. NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms. Hemoglobin. Accessed April 28, 2016. 9. How is Multiple Myeloma Staged? American Cancer Society. Accessed March 21, 2016. 10. NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms. Platelet. Accessed April 28, 2016. 11. NCI. Plasma cell neoplasms (including multiple myeloma) – Patient version. Overview. Accessed March 21, 2016. 12. IMF. Understanding Protein Electrophoresis, 2012. Accessed April 28, 2016. 13. NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms. Blood Urea Nitrogen. Accessed April 28, 2016. 14. NIH. U.S. National Library of Medicine. Total protein. Accessed March 21, 2016. 15. NCI. Plasma cell neoplasms (including multiple myeloma) Treatment – Patient version. Stages of Plasma Cell Neoplasms. Accessed March 21, 2016.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION AND APPROVED USES

KYPROLIS® (carfilzomib) can cause serious side effects:
  • Heart problems: KYPROLIS can cause heart problems or worsen pre-existing heart conditions. Death due to cardiac arrest has occurred within one day of KYPROLIS administration. Before starting KYPROLIS, you should have a full medical work-up (including blood pressure and fluid management). You should be closely monitored during treatment.
  • Kidney problems: There have been reports of sudden kidney failure in patients receiving KYPROLIS. Your kidney function should be closely monitored during treatment.
  • Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS): Cases of TLS have been reported in patients receiving KYPROLIS, including fatalities. You should be closely monitored during treatment for any signs of TLS.
  • Lung damage: Cases of lung damage have been reported in patients receiving KYPROLIS, including fatal cases.
  • Pulmonary hypertension (high blood pressure in the lungs): There have been reports of pulmonary hypertension in patients receiving KYPROLIS.
  • Lung complications: Shortness of breath was reported in patients receiving KYPROLIS. Your lung function should be closely monitored during treatment.
  • High blood pressure: Cases of high blood pressure, including fatal cases, have been reported in patients receiving KYPROLIS. Your blood pressure should be closely monitored during treatment.
  • Blood clots: There have been reports of blood clots in patients receiving KYPROLIS. If you are at high risk for blood clots, your doctor can recommend ways to lower the risk.
  • If you are using KYPROLIS in combination with dexamethasone or with lenalidomide plus dexamethasone, your doctor should assess and may prescribe another medicine to help lower your risk for blood clots.
  • If you are using birth control pills or other medical forms of birth control associated with a risk of blood clots, talk to your doctor and consider a different method of birth control during treatment with KYPROLIS in combination with dexamethasone or with lenalidomide plus dexamethasone.
  • Infusion reactions: Symptoms of infusion reactions included fever, chills, joint pain, muscle pain, facial flushing and/or swelling, vomiting, weakness, shortness of breath, low blood pressure, fainting, chest tightness, and chest pain. These symptoms can occur immediately following infusion or up to 24 hours after administration of KYPROLIS. If you experience any of these symptoms, contact your doctor immediately.
  • Severe bleeding problems: Fatal or serious cases of bleeding problems have been reported in patients receiving KYPROLIS. Your doctor should monitor your signs and symptoms of blood loss.
  • Very low platelet count: Low platelet levels can cause unusual bruising and bleeding. You should have regular blood tests to check your platelet count during treatment.
  • Liver problems: Cases of liver failure, including fatal cases, have been reported in patients receiving KYPROLIS. Your liver function should be closely monitored during treatment.
  • Blood problems: Cases of a blood disease called thrombotic microangiopathy, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura/hemolytic uremic syndrome (TTP/HUS), including fatal cases, have been reported in patients who received KYPROLIS. Your doctor should monitor your signs and symptoms.
  • Brain problems: A nerve disease called Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES), formerly called Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome (RPLS), has been reported in patients receiving KYPROLIS. It can cause seizure, headache, lack of energy, confusion, blindness, altered consciousness, and other visual and nerve disturbances, along with high blood pressure. Your doctor should monitor your signs and symptoms.
  • Possible fetal harm: KYPROLIS can cause harm to a fetus (unborn baby) when given to a pregnant woman. Women should avoid becoming pregnant during treatment with KYPROLIS. Men should avoid fathering a child during treatment with KYPROLIS. KYPROLIS can cause harm to a fetus if used during pregnancy or if you or your partner become pregnant during treatment with KYPROLIS.
You should contact your doctor immediately if you experience any of the following:
  • Shortness of breath
  • Prolonged, unusual or excessive bleeding
  • Yellowing of the skin and/or eyes (jaundice)
  • Headaches, confusion, seizures, or loss of sight
  • Pregnancy (women should not receive KYPROLIS if they are pregnant or breastfeeding)
  • Any other side effect that bothers you or does not go away
What are the possible side effects of KYPROLIS?
  • The most common side effects occurring in at least 20% of patients receiving KYPROLIS in the combination therapy trials are: low red blood cell count, low white blood cell count, diarrhea, difficulty breathing, tiredness (fatigue), low platelets, fever, sleeplessness (insomnia), muscle spasm, cough, upper airway (respiratory tract) infection, and decreased potassium levels.
  • The most common side effects occurring in at least 20% of patients receiving KYPROLIS when used alone (monotherapy) in trials are: low red blood cell count, tiredness (fatigue), low platelets, nausea, fever, difficulty breathing, diarrhea, headache, cough, swelling of the lower legs or hands.

These are not all the possible side effects of KYPROLIS. For more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please talk to your doctor and see the full Product Information for additional information.

APPROVED USES

  • KYPROLIS® (carfilzomib) is a prescription medication used to treat patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who have received one to three previous treatments for multiple myeloma. KYPROLIS is approved for use in combination with dexamethasone or with lenalidomide plus dexamethasone, which are other medicines used to treat multiple myeloma.
  • KYPROLIS® (carfilzomib) is a prescription medication used to treat patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who have received one or more previous treatments for multiple myeloma. KYPROLIS is approved for use alone to treat relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma.