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Find the support you need

Find resources that offer free information and tools to help you manage your multiple myeloma and take an active role in your treatment.

Patient and care partner resources

KYPROLIS Patient Starter Kit

Ask your doctor for the KYPROLIS Starter Kit.

If your doctor has prescribed KYPROLIS for you, ask about the KYPROLIS Starter Kit. It includes the KYPROLIS Brochure, Treatment Organizer, a tote bag, and other useful tools to help you with your care.

Discover how Amgen Assist 360™ can help you find resources most important to you.
Call 888-4ASSIST (888-427-7478) Monday through Friday, 9 am to 8 pm Eastern Time.

These downloadable resources provide tools and information about treatment with KYPROLIS® (carfilzomib).

KYPROLIS Patient and Care Partner Brochure

Download the KYPROLIS Brochure.

Find useful information about multiple myeloma and KYPROLIS in this Brochure.

Lab Results Tracker

Download the KYPROLIS Lab Results Tracker.

Keep track of M-protein and other lab numbers with this Lab Results Tracker.

Weekly Treatment Tracker

Download the KYPROLIS Weekly Treatment Tracker.

Help keep track of treatment and appointments with this Weekly Treatment Tracker.

Inspire others by telling your story

Through Amgen's Voices of Experience network, you can inspire others like you by sharing your experience with relapsed multiple myeloma and KYPROLIS. Call 1-855-894-4352 to learn more or visit voicesofexperience.net.

Glossary

Bone marrow: the soft, spongy tissue in the center of most bones. Bone marrow produces white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets1

Chemotherapy: the treatment of cancer by the use of chemicals or drugs1

Combination therapy (combination treatment): a type of treatment that combines 2 or more types of medicines. KYPROLIS is available in 2 approved combinations2

Immune system: a group of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to protect the body from disease and illness3

Immunomodulators: medicines that use the body’s immune system to fight cancer. The immune system protects the body from disease and illness1

Infusion: a way of putting fluids, including drugs, directly into the body. An intravenous infusion puts fluids directly into the bloodstream4

Infusion reaction: a side effect that a person may have after receiving an infusion5

M-proteins (monoclonal proteins): an antibody found in unusually large amounts in the blood or urine of people with multiple myeloma6

Monotherapy: a type of therapy that uses one type of medicine by itself. KYPROLIS is indicated as monotherapy7

Multiple myeloma: a cancer of the plasma cells found in the bone marrow1

Phase 3 trial: a type of research study for which large groups of people volunteer to take a drug or treatment. The results of the trial show whether the treatment works and is safe to use8

Plasma cell: a type of white blood cell that fights infection. With multiple myeloma, plasma cells turn into myeloma cells1

Platelet: a type of blood cell that helps blood to clot1

Prognosis: the likelihood that a disease will come back9

Radiation therapy: a type of therapy that treats cancer cells in one specific area of the body. It uses high-energy rays to either kill cancer cells or stop new ones from being made1

Randomized clinical trial: a research study for which people volunteer to take a drug or treatment. The volunteers are assigned by chance to receive either a new treatment or a current treatment10

Red blood cell: a type of blood cell that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body1

Refractory multiple myeloma: multiple myeloma that does not respond to treatment11

Relapsed multiple myeloma: multiple myeloma that comes back after it has been gone12

Respond: to show an improvement in signs and symptoms of a disease, related to a treatment that is received13

Side effect: a problem that happens when a treatment affects tissues or organs14

Stem cell transplant: a type of treatment that injects stem cells into the body to make healthy blood cells1

Steroids: medicines that are usually used to treat swelling. Sometimes they are used to treat multiple myeloma1

Symptom: something a person experiences that is a sign of the existence of a disease or condition15

Targeted therapy: a treatment that uses medicines that are designed to target only a specific feature of cancer cells1

White blood cell: a type of blood cell that helps the body fight infection1

References

1. Referenced with permission NCCN Guidelines for Patients®: Multiple Myeloma V.1.2016. ©National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc 2016. All rights reserved. Accessed May 2, 2016. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to NCCN.org. NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK®, NCCN®, NCCN GUIDELINES®, and all other NCCN Content are trademarks owned by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2. NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms. Combination Therapy. Accessed April 28, 2016. 3. NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms. Immune System. Accessed May 26, 2016. 4. NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms. Infusion. Accessed April 28, 2016. 5. Medical Dictionary. Infusion Reaction. Accessed July 14, 2016. 6. NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms. M Protein. Accessed April 28, 2016. 7. NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms. Monotherapy. Accessed April 28, 2016. 8. ClinicalTrials.gov. What are clinical trial phases? Accessed July 14, 2016. 9. NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms. Prognosis. Accessed May 26, 2016. 10. NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms. Randomized Clinical Trial. Accessed May 29, 2016. 11. NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms. Refractory Cancer. Accessed April 28, 2016. 12. NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms. Relapse. Accessed April 28, 2016. 13. NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms. Respond. Accessed April 28, 2016. 14. NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms. Side Effect. Accessed April 28, 2016. 15. NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms. Symptom. Accessed April 28, 2016.

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IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION AND APPROVED USES

KYPROLIS® (carfilzomib) can cause serious side effects:
  • Heart problems: KYPROLIS can cause heart problems or worsen pre-existing heart conditions. Death due to cardiac arrest has occurred within one day of KYPROLIS administration. Before starting KYPROLIS, you should have a full medical work-up (including blood pressure and fluid management). You should be closely monitored during treatment.
  • Kidney problems: There have been reports of sudden kidney failure in patients receiving KYPROLIS. Your kidney function should be closely monitored during treatment.
  • Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS): Cases of TLS have been reported in patients receiving KYPROLIS, including fatalities. You should be closely monitored during treatment for any signs of TLS.
  • Lung damage: Cases of lung damage have been reported in patients receiving KYPROLIS, including fatal cases.
  • Pulmonary hypertension (high blood pressure in the lungs): There have been reports of pulmonary hypertension in patients receiving KYPROLIS.
  • Lung complications: Shortness of breath was reported in patients receiving KYPROLIS. Your lung function should be closely monitored during treatment.
  • High blood pressure: Cases of high blood pressure, including fatal cases, have been reported in patients receiving KYPROLIS. Your blood pressure should be closely monitored during treatment.
  • Blood clots: There have been reports of blood clots in patients receiving KYPROLIS. If you are at high risk for blood clots, your doctor can recommend ways to lower the risk.
  • If you are using KYPROLIS in combination with dexamethasone or with lenalidomide plus dexamethasone, your doctor should assess and may prescribe another medicine to help lower your risk for blood clots.
  • If you are using birth control pills or other medical forms of birth control associated with a risk of blood clots, talk to your doctor and consider a different method of birth control during treatment with KYPROLIS in combination with dexamethasone or with lenalidomide plus dexamethasone.
  • Infusion reactions: Symptoms of infusion reactions included fever, chills, joint pain, muscle pain, facial flushing and/or swelling, vomiting, weakness, shortness of breath, low blood pressure, fainting, chest tightness, and chest pain. These symptoms can occur immediately following infusion or up to 24 hours after administration of KYPROLIS. If you experience any of these symptoms, contact your doctor immediately.
  • Severe bleeding problems: Fatal or serious cases of bleeding problems have been reported in patients receiving KYPROLIS. Your doctor should monitor your signs and symptoms of blood loss.
  • Very low platelet count: Low platelet levels can cause unusual bruising and bleeding. You should have regular blood tests to check your platelet count during treatment.
  • Liver problems: Cases of liver failure, including fatal cases, have been reported in patients receiving KYPROLIS. Your liver function should be closely monitored during treatment.
  • Blood problems: Cases of a blood disease called thrombotic microangiopathy, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura/hemolytic uremic syndrome (TTP/HUS), including fatal cases, have been reported in patients who received KYPROLIS. Your doctor should monitor your signs and symptoms.
  • Brain problems: A nerve disease called Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES), formerly called Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome (RPLS), has been reported in patients receiving KYPROLIS. It can cause seizure, headache, lack of energy, confusion, blindness, altered consciousness, and other visual and nerve disturbances, along with high blood pressure. Your doctor should monitor your signs and symptoms.
  • Possible fetal harm: KYPROLIS can cause harm to a fetus (unborn baby) when given to a pregnant woman. Women should avoid becoming pregnant during treatment with KYPROLIS. Men should avoid fathering a child during treatment with KYPROLIS. KYPROLIS can cause harm to a fetus if used during pregnancy or if you or your partner become pregnant during treatment with KYPROLIS.
You should contact your doctor immediately if you experience any of the following:
  • Shortness of breath
  • Prolonged, unusual or excessive bleeding
  • Yellowing of the skin and/or eyes (jaundice)
  • Headaches, confusion, seizures, or loss of sight
  • Pregnancy (women should not receive KYPROLIS if they are pregnant or breastfeeding)
  • Any other side effect that bothers you or does not go away
What are the possible side effects of KYPROLIS?
  • The most common side effects occurring in at least 20% of patients receiving KYPROLIS in the combination therapy trials are: low red blood cell count, low white blood cell count, diarrhea, difficulty breathing, tiredness (fatigue), low platelets, fever, sleeplessness (insomnia), muscle spasm, cough, upper airway (respiratory tract) infection, and decreased potassium levels.
  • The most common side effects occurring in at least 20% of patients receiving KYPROLIS when used alone (monotherapy) in trials are: low red blood cell count, tiredness (fatigue), low platelets, nausea, fever, difficulty breathing, diarrhea, headache, cough, swelling of the lower legs or hands.

These are not all the possible side effects of KYPROLIS. For more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please talk to your doctor and see the full Product Information for additional information.

APPROVED USES

  • KYPROLIS® (carfilzomib) is a prescription medication used to treat patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who have received one to three previous treatments for multiple myeloma. KYPROLIS is approved for use in combination with dexamethasone or with lenalidomide plus dexamethasone, which are other medicines used to treat multiple myeloma.
  • KYPROLIS® (carfilzomib) is a prescription medication used to treat patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who have received one or more previous treatments for multiple myeloma. KYPROLIS is approved for use alone to treat relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma.